Author Archives: Alex

Tube Strike and the Walk to Work

Two days after the 10th anniversary of the 7/7 tube bombings, and about two months before the planned start of all-night tube services on Fridays and Saturdays (“The Night Tube”), unions are staging a 24+hour strike that started to disrupt services during the Wednesday PM rush hour and led to no tube service at all on Thursday. This is the first strike to completely close the London Underground network since 2002 (although there have been plenty of quite disruptive partial closures due to so-called “industrial action” in our years here).

At first I thought the statement at the bottom was just a little bit ironic, but then I realized that some non-tube rail services, like the separate Docklands Light Railway and London Overground networks, were still running!

At first I thought the statement at the bottom was just a little bit ironic, but then I realized that some non-tube rail services, like the separate Docklands Light Railway and London Overground networks, were still running!

All four major unions are taking part in this strike, which is why the impact is so total. And why? Disputes over pay related to the introduction of the overnight services. Before you get too sympathetic for those poor train drivers having to work overnight, let me just remind you that the average driver salary (according to a report from the union itself!) is about $77,000 per year. Where else can you make that kind of money with no need for any special education or skills, and with excellent benefits (some reports suggest that they get around 50 days off per year)? The offer on the table is for a 2% raise along with a £2500 one-time bonus for those drivers on lines that will operate overnight. Plus, they are hiring 137 additional drivers to support the extra service, which means more jobs for the unions (isn’t that what they should want?). I can’t see how the public can really be on the unions’ side, given the massive disruption and real cost to the city as well as the terms of the deal and the fact that they don’t seem to be getting much of a message out there.  I really think such strikes should be illegal here like they are in New York!

Anyway, I was originally going to work from home to avoid the mess, but after some stern words from my employer insisting on relatively broadly defined “reasonable effort” to make it in, I decided to walk. I am in better shape than many others, as we live only a little more than 3 miles as the crow flies – but when walking that along streets and through the park that inflates to about 4.25 miles.

The straight line distance from home to work is only about 3.14 miles...but it typically takes at least 35 minutes on a normal day walking 5-10 minutes at each end and using one or two tube lines.

The straight line distance from home to work is only about 3.14 miles…but it typically takes at least 35 minutes on a normal day walking 5-10 minutes at each end and using one or two tube lines.

Here was my walking route this morning - one of the best things about London is the fact I could walk a different way each time and see new and interesting things, all while getting there and all being safe!

Here was my walking route this morning – one of the best things about London is the fact I could walk a different way each time and see new and interesting things, all while getting there and all being safe. I thought I was cutting a good diagonal across the park but ended up way too far east…but of course it isn’t so easy to get across the Serpentine in the middle!

Last night the strike was supposed to start at 6 or 630 pm, so they advised everyone to complete their journeys by 6pm. I had a late meeting and was in the office until about 630pm, but decided to still give the tube a shot. It was amazing – best commute home ever! Peak service levels were still running, but there were hardly any passengers! I should have gotten some pictures of the empty trains, but didn’t. By the time I exited at home at King’s Cross around 7pm they were starting to ramp down some services – the Metropolitan Line seemed to be the first to go, not surprisingly as it has the longest reach outside of London and also tends to be the most unionist stalwart (senior drivers seem to prefer this route because it is relatively long, has fewer passengers, and mostly outdoors in the countryside!).

To try to keep the city moving, Transport for London has mobilized about 200 extra buses – not a huge number compared to the approximately 8000 buses on the street each day, but targeted can be helpful – as well as additional Thames riverboat services. The key issue is that most* of the suburban rail services are still operating, leading to large volumes of passengers needing to travel from terminals to their final destinations (*there is a separate strike on First Great Western, the operator serving Paddington, due to concerns over reduced on-board train staff on the new long-distance trains that will be introduced in the next couple of years).

As I walked past Euston Station at 7:30 this morning, there were already big queues waiting for buses to take people onward to their destinations in the city...

As I walked past Euston Station at 7:30 this morning, there were already big queues waiting for buses to take people onward to their destinations in the city…

In addition to some non-red buses (gasp!), TfL also pressed some old Routemasters into use - here is one operating on the 205 route which runs parallel to the original 1863 tube line serving Paddington, Marylebone, Euston, King's Cross St. Pancras, and near Liverpool Street railway terminals.

In addition to some non-red buses (gasp!), TfL also pressed some old Routemasters into use – here is one operating on the 205 route which runs parallel to the original 1863 tube line serving Paddington, Marylebone, Euston, King’s Cross St. Pancras, and near Liverpool Street railway terminals.

After the long walk this morning I don’t think I’ll want to do that again tonight, but I have a work social event after work and I should be able to get a bus or use the operating Overground service to get home later in the evening. The real question, I suppose, is whether there will be additional strikes over this issue and how the dispute gets resolved (and whether it impacts the start of the night tube services in September or not!).

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2014 Travel – The Year in Review

Yesterday I published a look at travel statistics for 2014 – just shy of 115,000 miles flown on 61 flights, both of which were new records. Here I am going to review the year’s travel chronologically… in pictures. Lest anyone get the wrong idea, I must note that most of the time on business trips is spent in non-photogenic (i.e. ugly!) conference or hotel rooms…but I’m picking out the highlights here from special events or any extra time after the work was done!

JANUARY – AN ANNUAL PILGRIMAGE

Although we started the year in Dubrovnik, I was soon off to Washington DC for my annual trip to a massive transportation conference (in 2014 there were more than 12,000 people attending!). Unlike in past years, where I added on extra time to see family or for other work on the East Coast, 2014 was a quick turnaround.

For the last time, I took the Washington Flyer bus from Dulles Airport to the West Falls Church Metro Station. Later in 2014 the new Silver Line opened a good part of the way to Dulles, so next weekend I'll be taking the new shorter, cheaper and more frequent shuttle bus to the new metro station!

For the last time, I took the Washington Flyer bus from Dulles Airport to the West Falls Church Metro Station. Later in 2014 the new Silver Line opened a good part of the way to Dulles, so next weekend I’ll be taking the new shorter, cheaper and more frequent shuttle bus to the new metro station!

FEBRUARY – BACK TO BYZANTIUM

In February,  I spent a week in Istanbul for work, returning a little more than a year after our Christmas 2013 trip. Astrid went to Istanbul later in the year with our friend Sarah. While I spent more time riding the trains, I believe they spent more time shopping in the bazaar. There are things for both of us to like in Istanbul, that is for sure!

Istanbul has developed a very diverse transit infrastructure in recent years, with a lot more to come - this is the absolutely astonishing Metrobus, which is a 31-mile line in the median of a very busy expressway (sort of like Istanbul's beltway).

Istanbul has developed a very diverse transit infrastructure in recent years, with a lot more to come – this is the absolutely astonishing Metrobus, which is a 31-mile line in the median of a very busy expressway (sort of like Istanbul’s beltway). The line carries nearly 1 million passengers per day with buses every 14 seconds during rush hour (and about every 20 seconds the rest of the day!). This is the Edirnekapi station, which is near a station on the T4 light-rail line, which can be seen crossing above.

I also got to ride the new Marmaray train under the Bosphorus, linking the European and Asian sides of the city by rail for the first time. The Metrobus goes across the bridge, and ferries have long and frequently made the 30-min trip, but the train takes only about 5 min. This is the temporary terminal on the Asian side, which connects with the metro (Line M4). This line has one of the highest potential capacities of any in the world at more than 90,000 PPHPD (passenger per hour per direction).

I also got to ride the new Marmaray train under the Bosphorus, linking the European and Asian sides of the city by rail for the first time. The Metrobus goes across the bridge, and ferries have long and frequently made the 30-min trip, but the train takes only about 5 min. This is the temporary terminal on the Asian side, which connects with the metro (Line M4). This line has one of the highest potential capacities of any in the world at more than 90,000 PPHPD (passenger per hour per direction).

MARCH MEANT MEXICO

March was my first time in Mexico, with a week-long trip to Mexico City. It was interesting – amazing hospitality from our local hosts, including caring for my boss when he got sick during the week (and I had to take over everything!), great food, and interesting challenges for the metro – but also the feeling of being in an armed bubble, with a big security force surrounding us at all times (even surrounding our bus in pick-up trucks – no doubt also a type of hospitality, but not one that made me feel at ease).

The Mexico City Metro is one of the busiest in the world, and is different from many other metros in that it caters to the poorest people in the city...it is actually cheaper than buses (whereas in many other cities, especially in Latin America, the metro is the more premium mode for middle-class people and buses are for the poor). Because of this, and the very many people coming into the city (DF) from the surrounding State of Mexico,

The Mexico City Metro is one of the busiest in the world, and is different from many other metros in that it caters to the poorest people in the city…it is actually cheaper than buses (whereas in many other cities, especially in Latin America, the metro is the more premium mode for middle-class people and buses are for the poor). Because of this, and the very many people coming into the city (DF) from the surrounding State of Mexico, it is very busy.

This is the beautiful Art Deco Palacio de Bellas Artes, where our group had a private tour and a nice dinner.

This is the beautiful Art Deco Palacio de Bellas Artes, where our group had a private tour and a nice dinner.

On the Saturday our group was taken to Teotihuacan, the site of the famous pyramids less than an hour north of Mexico City. Here I am at the top of the Pyramid of the Sun after a climb of more than 200 feet in the hot sun. Behind me is the shorter Pyramid of the Moon.

On the Saturday our group was taken to Teotihuacan, the site of the famous pyramids less than an hour north of Mexico City. Here I am at the top of the Pyramid of the Sun after a climb of more than 200 feet in the hot sun. Behind me is the shorter Pyramid of the Moon.

This was the climb I made...pretty steep!

This was the climb I made to reach the vantage point in the picture above…pretty steep!

APRIL – A MIDWEST TOUR

At the start of April, a colleague and I made a trip through the Midwest of the US, visiting Dayton, Cleveland, suburban Chicago and Des Moines.

This is downtown Dayton, Ohio - looking out over Wright Stop Plaza, the downtown transit center, from the top of a tall building. See the green buses? This is the evening line-up, when buses from most routes all come together at once to allow transfers and then depart (a moment after this they start to pull out like a long green snake!). This particular transit center is special because it has trolley wire and serves trolley buses...despite being a smaller city and transit system Dayton is one of only five US cities to have any trolley buses remaining.

This is downtown Dayton, Ohio – looking out over Wright Stop Plaza, the downtown transit center, from the top of a tall building. See the green buses? This is the evening line-up, when buses from most routes all come together at once to allow transfers and then depart (a moment after this they start to pull out like a long green snake!). This particular transit center is special because it has trolley wire and serves trolley buses…despite being a smaller city and transit system Dayton is one of only five US cities to have any trolley buses remaining.

While in Dayton we also got to visit the US Air Force Museum at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, which was just massive with a very impressive range of planes on display.

While in Dayton we also got to visit the US Air Force Museum at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, which was just massive with a very impressive range of planes on display.

In Cleveland we had to check out the HealthLine, Cleveland's BRT (Bus Rapid Transit) route...the many hospitals along the route (including the famous Cleveland Clinic) paid to "sponsor" the route. It is one of the only BRT lines in the US considered to be true BRT (but only to a 'bronze' level worldwide, not 'gold'). It operates 24/7, every 30 min overnight, every 7.5 min all day weekdays, and every 15 min evenings and weekends. Here the special BRT vehicles (which have doors on both sides for island platform stations) is at the eastern end of the line, Louis Stokes/Windermere Station on Cleveland's heavy rail Red Line.

In Cleveland we had to check out the HealthLine, Cleveland’s BRT (Bus Rapid Transit) route…the many hospitals along the route (including the famous Cleveland Clinic) paid to “sponsor” the route. It is one of the only BRT lines in the US considered to be true BRT (but only to a ‘bronze’ level worldwide, not ‘gold’). It operates 24/7, every 30 min overnight, every 7.5 min all day weekdays, and every 15 min evenings and weekends. Here the special BRT vehicles (which have doors on both sides for island platform stations) is at the eastern end of the line, Louis Stokes/Windermere Station on Cleveland’s heavy rail Red Line.

Speaking of the Cleveland Red Line, here is the far other end of the 19-mile, 18-station route - at Cleveland Hopkins International Airport. We used the train both ways between the airport and downtown...it runs about 4am-1am 7 days a week, every 15 min all the time except every 7.5 min during rush hours between the airport and downtown and every 30 min after 9pm. This was the first airport-rail connection in the United States when it opened in 1968 (airport rail links were the topic of my master's thesis!).

Speaking of the Cleveland Red Line, here is the far other end of the 19-mile, 18-station route – at Cleveland Hopkins International Airport. We used the train both ways between the airport and downtown…it runs about 4am-1am 7 days a week, every 15 min all the time except every 7.5 min during rush hours between the airport and downtown and every 30 min after 9pm. This was the first airport-rail connection in the United States when it opened in 1968 (airport rail links were the topic of my master’s thesis!).

Although business was in suburban Chicago, we had a weekend day to spend in Chicago.

We managed to find a hotel in the booming River North area, just outside the loop and with a view of Marina City. The design of this mixed-use complex adjacent to the Chicago River has always attracted my eye - it was designed in the late 50s and finished in 1964. The two identical 65-story towers each have 19 floors of parking and then apartments (now condos) that are comprised of pie-shaped wedges - see

We managed to find a hotel in the booming River North area, just outside the loop and with a view of Marina City. The design of this mixed-use complex adjacent to the Chicago River has always attracted my eye for the bold modernist design – it was designed in the late 50s and finished in 1964. The two identical 65-story towers each have 19 floors of parking and then apartments (now condos) that are comprised of pie-shaped wedges – see Wikipedia for more info.

We made quick work of the key Chicago attractions - seeing the loop elevated trains, deep-dish pizza, and the Sears Tower - reminding me of my first visit to Chicago, probably the first truly big and great city I ever visited when I was just maybe 7 or 8. But what Chicago visit nowadays would be complete without visiting Cloud Gate, aka The Bean? This is the reflection in the bean - can you see the photographer? You can also see in the center the very sleek Edward Stone 1972 tower with similar styling (if not materials) to the original World Trade Center New York , originally the Standard Oil Building and still the 7th tallest in the US.

We made quick work of the key Chicago attractions – seeing the loop elevated trains, deep-dish pizza, and the Sears Tower – reminding me of my first visit to Chicago, probably the first truly big and great city I ever visited when I was just maybe 7 or 8. But what Chicago visit nowadays would be complete without visiting Cloud Gate, aka The Bean? This is the reflection in the bean – can you see the photographer? You can also see in the center the very sleek Edward Stone 1972 tower with similar styling (if not materials) to the original World Trade Center New York , originally the Standard Oil Building and still the 7th tallest in the US.

The last stop on the Midwest Tour was Des Moines. Not much to report from “flyover country”, although to be fair it was a decent place that exceeded my expectations.  I thought I had a picture of a sign that said “Des Moines – not as bad as you think” but I can’t find it!

APRIL IN LOVELY LISBOA

What better to encapsulate our excellent long weekend in Lisbon in April than a tram? Astrid and I both were enamored with the colorful and dynamic city by the water...

What better to encapsulate our excellent long weekend in Lisbon in April than a tram? Astrid and I both were enamored with the colorful and dynamic city by the water…for more, see the many posts we made about Lisbon, including the roofs, the street scenes, the river, and our general overview.

MAY MEGA-TRIP TO THE US AND CANADA

May took me to Toronto, one of my favorite cities in North America - going all the way back to my first visit with my parents in 1993. Although others laugh, to me Toronto is a cleaner, nicer, gentler version of New York...it is one of the most diverse cities in the world, actually. Even though its subway is quite small compared to New York, it is similar in style and dense, except for this picture - which is the Sheppard Line, an outer stub that opened in 2002. One of the best features of the transit system in Toronto is the excellent intermodal connectivity between the subway, streetcars, and buses.

May took me to Toronto, one of my favorite cities in North America – going all the way back to my first visit with my parents in 1993. Although others laugh, to me Toronto is a cleaner, nicer, gentler version of New York…it is one of the most diverse cities in the world, actually. Even though its subway is quite small compared to New York, it is similar in style and dense, except for this picture – which is the Sheppard Line, an outer stub that opened in 2002. One of the best features of the transit system in Toronto is the excellent intermodal connectivity between the subway, streetcars, and buses. We had a great reception at the Hockey Hall of Fame and then dinner at the top of the CN Tower, the long-time tallest freestanding tower in the world (not eclipsed by the Burj in Dubai), but it was so foggy that the pictures didn’t turn out too well.

Have you ever had a formal dinner in a bus maintenance workshop? I have to say it was quite unique and better than you would imagine thanks to the imagination and hard work of the proud hosts!

Have you ever had a formal dinner in a bus maintenance workshop? I have to say it was quite unique and better than you would imagine thanks to the imagination and hard work of the hosts!

In between work in Toronto and Rochester/Buffalo, I had a nice weekend stop in Niagara. We even managed to get there by GO train and bus - excellent double-deckers in use in Ontario, and despite the lower density outside of the city of Toronto there is healthy transit service and usage...as usual, Canada providing a model for its US neighbors!

In between work in Toronto and Rochester/Buffalo, I had a nice weekend stop in Niagara. We even managed to get there by GO train and bus – excellent double-deckers in use in Ontario, and despite the lower density outside of the city of Toronto there is healthy transit service and usage…as usual, Canada providing a model for its US neighbors!

Although it is gimmicky, I have always loved Niagara (Ontario, not NY!). After this, a colleague and I crossed the border on foot (the first time I've done that in the US-bound direction) and tried to get a bus from Niagara into Buffalo. Sadly, we waited on the wrong side of the street for the hourly bus - even transit professionals can't figure it out with very limited and poor signage - and had to get a taxi (gasp!) to the Niagara Falls Amtrak stop (calling it a station would give it too much dignity).

Although it is gimmicky, I have always loved Niagara (Ontario, not NY!). After this, a colleague and I crossed the border on foot (the first time I’ve done that in the US-bound direction) and tried to get a bus from Niagara into Buffalo. Sadly, we waited on the wrong side of the street for the hourly bus – even transit professionals can’t figure it out with very limited and poor signage – and had to get a taxi (gasp!) to the Niagara Falls Amtrak stop (calling it a station would give it too much dignity).

After the work part was done, I had essentially three days on my own before meeting Astrid in Los Angeles for the family part of this massive May trip. As you can imagine, I agonized over how to spend this precious time. Visiting friends in the US was basically ruled out due to working weekday, and from a starting point of Buffalo I had to end up on the fourth day in LA. I seriously considered a visit to the Canadian Club factory in Windsor, Ontario followed by a dark tourism stop in Detroit, but I figured that wouldn’t work so well by transit and with lots of luggage.

Instead, I chose to visit Calgary and Edmonton, two Canadian cities (and two excellent modern light rail systems) that I had always wanted to see. This required a complicated travel plan, especially since air travel to and within Canada is generally pretty expensive (with the airport in Toronto, for example, having some of the highest taxes/fees of any in the world). I devised a cunning plan, combining the purchase of cheap segments with an available first-class miles redemption from Dallas to Calgary (for the expensive cross-border part). Now, you are probably thinking that Dallas is slightly off any sensible route from Buffalo to Calgary…but such is life in “air world”.

It started brilliantly; a hard but rewarding day’s work in Buffalo, with an early arrival and easy check-in at the airport, and settling down in the US Airways Club with a nice glass of wine. 30 seconds later, the iPad revealed that my flight to Dallas that night was cancelled! Instead of a relaxing night in the Hyatt Regency DFW and an easy 10am start the next morning, I had a ‘free’ night at the crappy Days Inn Buffalo Airport and a 4:30am wake-up for a 6am flight to Chicago, to then connect to Dallas all in time for my scheduled 10:55 flight to Calgary. I was actually hoping that my extensive luggage wouldn’t make it through both tight connections (so they would have to deliver it to me in Calgary instead of me carrying it!), but it did.

Some tense moments and a little running at DFW got me to the Calgary flight just in time…and the plan was back on track. Until Canadian border officials in Calgary didn’t like my reason for being there – “just to visit the city” – and decided to give me an extra private interrogation and a VERY thorough check of all my bags. I thought Canadians were all supposed to be friendly? Again, I know that a lot of people get treated like this all the time, so I shouldn’t complain – but after a 4:30am start and the hassle of the day, I wasn’t in the mood. After that, I have to say, Calgary and Edmonton were nice cities.

The Calgary C-Train is one of the best light rail systems in North America, with more riders than all othe busiest modern light rail system in North America,

The Calgary C-Train is one of the best light rail systems in North America, with higher ridership than all of the US ones. It started running in 1981 and has been expanding incrementally since then. It covers about 36 miles and has 45 stations, with two routes that overlap in the downtown core. They key is frequency; each route operates every 10 minutes virtually all of the time (7 days a week) and every 4-5 minutes during rush hours, leading to a very busy downtown core (as shown above) with trains every 2-3 min. Again, as with Toronto, Calgary sets the model for its American cousins to the south – that an North American city with lower density and high car ownership can have good transit that is well used by all.

I then ventured even further north to Edmonton, in the comfort of a Greyhound (Canada) Express service. Who can argue with $25?

The Edmonton Transit System light rail line was the first modern one in North America, starting the trend that the San Diego Trolley brought to the US in 1981 and that has exploded primarily in the South and West of the US in the past 30 years. It is still small - a single 13-mile line with 15 stations - but is dense, carrying about the same number of riders as the San Diego Trolley that is 4x as big. Again, the key is frequency; every 5 min during rush hours, every 10 min all day weekdays and Saturdays, and every 15 min evenings and Sundays. It is really more of a light metro line, with four-unit trains in operation and the downtown section with 6 stations being underground. This picture is the Southgate Station, which opened in 2010 adjacent to a mall...even though it is in the middle of a large road it has good facilities with a transit center with bus connections and parking.

The Edmonton Transit System light rail line was the first modern one in North America, starting the trend that the San Diego Trolley brought to the US in 1981 and that has exploded primarily in the South and West of the US in the past 30 years. It is still small – a single 13-mile line with 15 stations – but is dense, carrying about the same number of riders as the San Diego Trolley that is 4x as big. Again, the key is frequency; every 5 min during rush hours, every 10 min all day weekdays and Saturdays, and every 15 min evenings and Sundays. It is really more of a light metro line, with four-unit trains in operation and the downtown section with 6 stations being underground. This picture is the Southgate Station, which opened in 2010 adjacent to a mall…even though it is in the middle of a large road it has good facilities with a transit center with bus connections and parking.

I used the ETS Route 747 to connect from the end of the light rail line at Century Park Station to the airport, which is quite a distance south of the city. The non-stop bus trip was about 25 min for $5, and had a luggage rack. But despite having a very nice transit center at Century Park the stop for the bus was on the main road and not signed at all - a disgrace! Note the advertising for London on the bus :)

I used the ETS Route 747 to connect from the end of the light rail line at Century Park Station to the airport, which is quite a distance south of the city. The non-stop bus trip was about 25 min for $5, and had a luggage rack. But despite having a very nice transit center at Century Park the stop for the bus was on the main road and not signed at all – a disgrace! Note the advertising for London on the bus 🙂 Despite that, my next stop would be Los Angeles via Vancouver on WestJet.

After more than a week visiting families in Los Angeles and Baltimore (where we proudly watched my little brother graduate from High School), we made a quick stop in New Jersey to visit our storage unit, pack up a few things, and then head home.

JUNE – JUST AS BUSY

After getting back home from the mega-trip, we headed right back out for a quick weekend in Manchester. We had scheduled this long before the May madness was arranged based on a great deal – the ability to add a domestic flight within the UK onto either (or both) ends of any European award flight redemption on British Airways for free. So, despite living a 5-minute walk from Euston Station, which has express trains every 20 minutes to Manchester that take about 2 hours, we actually flew from Heathrow as an add-on to our flight back from Lisbon (there can be up to a year stop-over in between, as I understand it – it just requires you knowing what you want in advance, because changes cost about $50 each).

The Manchester weekend was relaxing - it is definitely the most dynamic city in the UK after London, with a good vibe and a great new light rail system (Metrolink). Here is Astrid on the Metrolink platform with the historic Roman style Manchester Central Library in the background.

The Manchester weekend was relaxing – it is definitely the most dynamic city in the UK after London, with a good vibe and a great new light rail system (Metrolink). Here is Astrid with the historic Roman style Manchester Central Library in the background.

This is Manchester Metrolink - it started in 1992 and has grown significantly in the last couple of years, to a total of 57 miles and 92 stations with 7 different services that each typically operate every 12 min (with some overlapping). This photo is at Altrincham, the southern terminal of the original line, which was converted from a railway line.

This is Manchester Metrolink – it started in 1992 and has grown significantly in the last couple of years, to a total of 57 miles and 92 stations with 7 different services that each typically operate every 12 min (with some overlapping). This photo is at Altrincham, the southern terminal of the original line, which was converted from a railway line.

In Manchester we visited the Museum of Science and Industry, which has on its grounds something unassuming but quite remarkable - the world's first railway station. This was Liverpool Road Station, the Manchester end of the world's first railway to be entirely by steam power - the Liverpool and Manchester Railway. Now, being from Baltimore I was initially skeptical, as I had believed that the Baltimore and Ohio (B&O) Railroad was the world's first - but it seems from Wikipedia that both started operations in 1830, but the British one had all steam (no horses) first. Interestingly, this first station became so overmatched so quickly by the success of the railway that it was closed in 1844!

In Manchester we visited the Museum of Science and Industry, which has on its grounds something unassuming but quite remarkable – the world’s first railway station. This was Liverpool Road Station, the Manchester end of the world’s first railway to be entirely by steam power – the Liverpool and Manchester Railway. Now, being from Baltimore I was initially skeptical, as I had believed that the Baltimore and Ohio (B&O) Railroad was the world’s first – but it seems from Wikipedia that both started operations in 1830, but the British one had all steam (no horses) first. Interestingly, this first station became overmatched so quickly by the success of the railway that it was closed in 1844!

Later in June I was very happy to be able to return to Malaysia and Singapore. Despite the extreme heat I really liked both places on my first visit in 2013, and it was great to confirm those first impressions in 2014.

Petronas Towers

Here are one of the symbols of KL, the Petronas Towers, with a nice evening view. I went to the top (and across the 42nd-story skybridge!) in 2013. Designed by Cesar Pelli and finished in 1998, these took over the “Tallest Building in the World” title in 1998 from the Sears Tower (which had reigned for 25 years). However, with the incredible wave of skyscraper construction in the China Region, Petronas only lasted 6 years at the top, when Taipei 101 took over, and now they are only number 9. See more info from Wikipedia.

The main entrance, just a 2-min walk from the railway station.

From my post “Speaking of Monkeys“, here is the entrance to Batu Caves on the outskirts of Kuala Lumpur.

My home for

My home for the nearly 8-hour train journey from Singapore to Kuala Lumpur. The distance is about 220 miles, or very similar to Washington-New York, with very frequent flights that take about an hour. But I wanted to see the countryside! Unfortunately, despite “splurging” for first class, the train was pretty tired and my window had some sort of glazing issue such that I couldn’t really see out. There are plans for a new high-speed rail link between the two large cities, which may finally happen. I used the fantastic Seat 61 website for information about traveling by train around the world.

The Marina Bay Sands

The view out my hotel window showing the ridiculous-yet-mesmerizing Marina Bay Sands hotel and casino, with the two pods of the Esplanade Theatre on the Bay in the foreground. My hotel, the Fairmont Hotel Singapore, was probably the nicest hotel I have ever stayed in, with the best hotel breakfast ever!

They say that you can't really experience Singapore without trying chilli crab, which I missed on my first trip - so here I am at the end of the messy feast at Jumbo along the Singapore River.

They say that you can’t really experience Singapore without trying chilli crab, which I missed on my first trip – so here I am at the end of the messy feast at Jumbo along the Singapore River.

JULY – HOME JAMES

We didn’t really do much in July.

AUGUST IN CHINA

After a break, it was on the road again to China in August, with the first stop being a week in Shanghai. Although I was there in 2010 on one of my first work trips, so much has changed in Shanghai in that short time, including the continued massive growth of the metro into the world’s largest.

Since late 2013 Shanghai Metro is now the largest dedicated metro network in the world, covering more than 340 miles (compared to New York's 232 or London Underground's 250).

Since late 2013 Shanghai Metro is now the largest dedicated metro network in the world, covering more than 340 miles (compared to New York’s 232 or London Underground’s 250). I am really proud to be working with them to help make it all work…it is a massive challenge! Here is one of the vertical access points to Line 1 at People’s Square, the Times Square of Shanghai – it is both the busiest station in terms of entries and exits but also a massive interchange between the two original and busiest lines (1 and 2). Do you see the woman with the light blue umbrella on the middle stair? Yes, that’s right – at one of the busiest places on earth she is blocking the flow by talking on her mobile phone (I watched her stand there for a good 3 minutes!).

You thought the Petronas Towers were impressive? Well, I had to visit the Lujiazui area of Pudong again where Shanghai is growing skyscrapers like corn (or should I say rice?) to create what appears to be the world's first cluster of supertall buildings! On the left is the Shanghai World Financial Center (known as the bottle opener because of its distinctive top) opened in 2008 as the 2nd tallest in the world (now 7th) - I went to the top in 2010. In the center is what actually might be my favorite, the Jin Mao Tower. It was the first in the area, finished in 1999, and was then in the top ten (but now is only 17th worldwide). The upper floors house the Grand Hyatt Hotel, which has a really cool interior atrium (as well as a semi-affordable Italian restaurant on the 56th floor with great views - a good lunch stop!). On the right is the nearly-completed Shanghai

You thought the Petronas Towers were impressive? Well, I had to visit the Lujiazui area of Pudong again where Shanghai is growing skyscrapers like corn (or should I say rice?) to create what appears to be the world’s first cluster of supertall buildings! On the left is the Shanghai World Financial Center (known as the bottle opener because of its distinctive top) opened in 2008 as the 2nd tallest in the world (now 7th) – I went to the top in 2010. In the center is what actually might be my favorite, the Jin Mao Tower. It was the first in the area, finished in 1999, and was then in the top ten (but now is only 17th worldwide). The upper floors house the Grand Hyatt Hotel, which has a really cool interior atrium (as well as a semi-affordable Italian restaurant on the 56th floor with great views – a good lunch stop!). On the right is the nearly-completed Shanghai Tower, which at over 2,000 feet tall and 121 stories is now the 2nd tallest in the world (only the Burj Khalifa in Dubai is taller). It is distinguished by its twisting, two-layered facade. I look forward to visiting it and going to the top (in the world’s fastest and longest elevator traveling 40mph and about 1900 feet!) next time.

At the end of the week I took a train from Shanghai to Nanjing, which is a little under 200 miles. The high-speed train took only about an hour and 20 minutes (even with a couple of intermediate stops). As my train proceeded northwest, the atmosphere got more and more desolate…away from the coast and the financial center of Shanghai are the factories, which produce the famously dreadful Chinese air quality.

This was the view from my 53rd story hotel room. No, it wasn't stormy...just the usual awful air quality and smog that makes it virtually impossible to see anything from above! I could actually see where the nearby metro line came above ground, but I didn't realize that until my third day there because it was invisible!

This was the view from my 53rd story hotel room at the new Fairmont Nanjing, which was preparing to host the 2014 Summer Youth Olympics right after I left. No, it wasn’t stormy…just the usual awful air quality and smog that makes it virtually impossible to see anything from above! I could actually see where the nearby metro line came above ground, but I didn’t realize that until my third day there because it was invisible!

Despite the air quality, Nanjing (which means "Southern Capital" - Beijing is "Northern Capital") was a nice city that I would like to have more time to visit. It's conceptual place in Chinese history is kind of like Kyoto in Japan - an ancient capital that has a lot of culture. This is Line 1 of the metro at the north terminal, Maigaoqaio. The metro in Nanjing is designed a lot like Hong Kong, by which I mean to say a bit higher quality than some of the other cookie-cutter ones in China. It is also growing dramatically quickly - it doubled in size this past June when three new lines opened simultaneously.

Despite the air quality, Nanjing (which means “Southern Capital” – Beijing is “Northern Capital”) was a nice city that I would like to have more time to visit. It’s conceptual place in Chinese history is kind of like Kyoto in Japan – an ancient capital that has a lot of culture. This is Line 1 of the metro at the north terminal, Maigaoqaio. The metro in Nanjing is designed a lot like Hong Kong, by which I mean to say a bit higher quality than some of the other cookie-cutter ones in China. It is also growing dramatically quickly – it doubled in size this past June when three new lines opened simultaneously.

After three days in Nanjing I flew to Hong Kong for my final stop. This was my first flight on Dragonair, the shorter-distance subsidiary of Cathay Pacific. The flight was good, although the delay on the ground was longer than the entire 2:30 flying time! I understand that this is becoming more and more common as Chinese air space is often taken up by the military. It was very stormy in Hong Kong, but having selected a hotel adjacent to the Tsim Sha Tsui MTR station, I didn’t even have to go outside!

After Nanjing I flew to Hong Kong for a couple of days of work there - the MTR there is absolutely one of the best designed and best run metros in the world. This is Kowloon Tong Station on the Kwun Tong (green) Line, where the line interchanges with the East Rail Line that goes to the border with the Mainland at Shenzhen. Here during rush hours they have one attendant per door to manage the massive passenger flows.

After Nanjing I flew to Hong Kong for a couple of days of work there – the MTR there is absolutely one of the best designed and best run metros in the world. This is Kowloon Tong Station on the Kwun Tong (green) Line, where the line interchanges with the East Rail Line that goes to the border with the Mainland at Shenzhen. Here during rush hours they have one attendant per door to manage the massive passenger flows.

At the end of August, after so many trips through Helsinki Airport, I finally got out and entered Finland! Astrid and I had a great long weekend there, enjoying the long hours of daylight, the relatively laid back atmosphere, and especially the island fortress of Suomenlinna.

Here I am in front of Helsinki Central Station (known as "Helsinki C"), one of the most beautiful railway stations in the world (this one is from 1919). After so many trips through Helsinki Airport I finally got out and entered Finaland! Astrid and I had a great long weekend at the end of August, especially enjoying the very long daylight.

Here I am in front of Helsinki Central Station (known as “Helsinki C”), one of the most beautiful railway stations in the world (this one is from 1919). It was designed by Eliel Saarinen, who later moved to the US…his son Eero Saarinen became a very important American architect in the post-war period, including the Gateway Arch in St. Louis, the TWA terminal at JFK, and the main terminal at Dulles Airport.

This is a scenic shot from the island fortress of Suomenlinna, probably our favorite spot in Helsinki. It is a UNESCO World Heritage Site, it was originally built by the Swedes starting in 1748 (called Sveaborg) to defend against the Russians, and they told us that it was considered to be the other great sea fortress of Europe after Gibraltar. It deserves its own post, for sure - but it was really pleasant with beautiful weather. Here you can see the water through the archway where the ferry from Helsinki dropped us off.

This is a scenic shot from the island fortress of Suomenlinna, probably our favorite spot in Helsinki. It is a UNESCO World Heritage Site, it was originally built by the Swedes starting in 1748 (called Sveaborg) to defend against the Russians, and they told us that it was considered to be the other great sea fortress of Europe after Gibraltar. It deserves its own post, for sure – but it was really pleasant with beautiful weather. Here you can see the water through the archway where the ferry from Helsinki dropped us off.

SEPTEMBER SPEEDWAY

I started September in Vienna, on a quick one-day trip to that amazing city. It definitely requires a longer return with Astrid! From there I had to be in Barcelona a day later, so I took 22 hours to cross Europe by overnight sleeper train to Zurich and then on across Switzerland to Geneva and then into France and ultimately Spain by high-speed TGV train.

The view out of my hotel room of the Sagrada Famlia, the famous still-unfinished Gaudi church in Barcelona. I have to go back in 2015 for work and Astrid is definitely coming along to visit this amazing city.

The view out of my hotel room of the Sagrada Famlia, the famous still-unfinished Gaudi church in Barcelona. After three trips already I have to go back in 2015 for work and Astrid is definitely coming along to visit this amazing city.

After Barcelona, while Astrid went to Istanbul for a week’s vacation, I headed to Delhi in India – a new country! It was overwhelming – a week of hard work but also Delhi belly, extreme poverty, and amazing transformation as they build one of the world’s biggest modern metro systems.

September also brought my first ever trip to India. It was overwhelming and deserving of a separate post - a week of hard work but also Delhi belly, extreme poverty, amazing transformation as they build one of the world's biggest modern metro systems, etc. Here is a shot of me at a formal visit to Humayun's Tomb, one of Delhi's 3 UNESCO World Heritage Sites.

Here is a shot of me at a formal visit to Humayun’s Tomb, one of Delhi’s 3 UNESCO World Heritage Sites.

The metro system in Delhi is truly transforming a city, skipping lots of steps in between from people on foot or animal to very fast and modern travel through the city. The system only started operating in 2002, and already trains have been extended from 4 cars to 6 cars (as shown here on the Blue Line) and to 8 cars on the very busy Yellow Line, which is the maximum length. I wonder if it should have therefore been designed for 10 or 12 cars then?

The metro system in Delhi is truly transforming the city, skipping from people on foot or animal to very fast and modern travel through the city. The system only started operating in 2002, and already trains have been extended from 4 cars to 6 cars (as shown here on the Blue Line) and to 8 cars on the very busy Yellow Line, which is the maximum length. I wonder if it should have therefore been designed for 10 or 12 cars then?

OCTOBER – DEEP IN THE HEART OF TEXAS

A week after returning from Delhi – just enough time for my stomach to recover from a week straight of Indian food – it was time for Tex-Mex on another trip to Texas, this time primarily to Austin.

After the work we were fortunate enough to be given tickets to Austin City Limits as a gift!

After the work we were fortunate enough to be given tickets to Austin City Limits as a gift!Now I am not a music nut like so many others, but it was cool to experience the famous festival. My colleague kept comparing it to the many European festivals he has attended and found it to be less rowdy and much cleaner!

After Austin, we hopped on a Megabus to Houston for a quick overnight stop. Houston was the largest city in the US I’d never been to, and I have to say it was a bit more cosmopolitan than I was expecting.

After Austin, we hopped on a Megabus to Houston for a quick overnight stop - early in the morning I got to have a look at Houston's MetroRail. They have big plans for expansion - this is the southern terminal  of the original (2004) line, now the Red Line - which is pretty dense serving the massive Texas Medical Center as well as downtown. Despite the car culture of oil capital Houston, the line has been a success. Once again, frequency is the name of the game  - the core of the line operates every 6 minutes all day weekdays and every 12 minutes weekends (from 4am-8pm).

Early on my only day in Houston I dashed out to have a look at Houston’s MetroRail. This is the southern terminal of the original (2004) line, now the Red Line – which is pretty dense serving the massive Texas Medical Center as well as downtown. Despite the car culture of oil capital Houston, the line has been a success. Once again, frequency is the name of the game – the core of the line operates every 6 minutes all day weekdays and every 12 minutes weekends (from 4am-8pm).

By far the most important happening in October, however, was getting our permanent residency here in the UK! After a lot of paperwork and money – and a test – we made it…see our separate post about it.

NOVEMBER – A FORBIDDEN CITY AND A “PRETTY GOOD” (maybe even great) WALL

After a special birthday visit to the top of the Shard in London, I headed off on Finnair (via Helsinki once more) to the Far East, this time to Beijing.

This is the impressive airport express train at Beijing Capital Airport's international Terminal 3, the second largest terminal in the world (after Dubai's Terminal 3). The airport as a whole is now the 2nd busiest in the world after Atlanta and growing fast and passing London Heathrow in 2010.

This is the impressive airport express train at Beijing Capital Airport’s international Terminal 3, the second largest terminal in the world (after Dubai’s Terminal 3). The airport as a whole is now the 2nd busiest in the world after Atlanta and growing fast and passing London Heathrow in 2010.

I unfortunately didn't have time to actually visit the Forbidden City (next time!), but here is the outside - see Chairman Mao's photo in the center? Across the street is his mausoleum...-:)

I unfortunately didn’t have time to actually visit the Forbidden City (next time!), but here is the outside – see Chairman Mao’s photo in the center? Across the street is his mausoleum…-:)

A pretty good wall, I'd say - we were fortunate that our gracious hosts took the group to the Badaling Great Wall, only about an hour west of Beijing. It was really cold though! I had to bundle up by borrowing a hat and buying some gloves.

A pretty good wall, I’d say – we were fortunate that our gracious hosts took the group to the Badaling Great Wall, only about an hour west of Beijing. It was really cold though! I had to bundle up by borrowing a hat and buying some gloves.

DECEMBER

We tried for the second year in a row (and succeeded this time!) to visit the famous German Christmas Market in Birmingham – it is said to be the largest in the world not actually in Deutschland. Astrid attempted to eat a bratwurst that was 1/2 meter long, while I chomped down on some schnitzel.

Bratwurst and Schnitzel

Bratwurst and Schnitzel – what more could you want?

To wrap it up, our very relaxing Algarve holiday in Portugal that you’ve been reading about.

Looks like paradise, doesn't it? The beautiful blue sky, blue ocean, and shimmering sunshine of the Algarve. This is the Nossa Senhora da Rocha chapel in a picture-perfect setting.

Looks like paradise, doesn’t it? The beautiful blue sky, blue ocean, and shimmering sunshine of the Algarve. This is the Nossa Senhora da Rocha chapel in a picture-perfect setting.

If you made it this far, thank you for reading my annual chronicle. I’m sorry that more of these didn’t come out over the course of the year.

Best wishes to all for a happy and healthy 2015!

2014 Travel Statistics – Records to the East, Records to the West

Here I am, in the middle, bringing you my 2014 year-end review from wintry England. This is my fourth annual year-end review (previous installments were 2011, 2012, and 2013). Although it may not have always felt like it, this fifth year of life in Europe and life as a business traveler was  a record-breaking one. I spent 35% of the year, or a whopping 129 nights, not at home – 10 more than 2012 and 13 more than 2013. And more of it was for business purposes (and therefore not with Astrid)…only 23% of those nights away were personal (compared to a solid 1/3 last year).

So, while Astrid and I were away together for 25 nights, that means that we were apart an average of nearly 9 nights a month. This is mostly because in 2014 Astrid and I didn’t have a long trip together like our South American odyssey in 2013 or as many weekend breaks as in prior years – something we hope to fix in 2015. But it was also because both of us were busier with work, with Astrid away on business (with me at home in London) for six nights.

Being away for 99 days for business purposes sounds like a dream, and it still is in many ways – I’ll cover some of the highlights below – but it does take a toll on an individual, no matter the degree of comfort in travel (which is admittedly thankfully quite high!). This year was also one for returning to some destinations, which I worried might be a bit of a let-down but actually found was quite nice, helping me to go slightly beyond first impressions.

I refer to east and west in the title because my time away from jolly old England was primarily in North America and Asia. I spent 15% of 2015 in North America, more than any year since living there (53 nights vs. just 42 in 2013). It was also nice to diversify in North America a bit, spending 8 nights in Mexico and 10 in Canada. The big increase in 2014 compared to prior years was Asia, where I spent more than twice as much time in 2014 as 2013 (37 vs. 15 nights). About half of this time was two trips to the China Region, but also a very welcome encore trip to Malaysia and Singapore and introductions to Delhi and Seoul.

I spent 10 nights on airplanes in 2014, very similar to previous years – and interestingly, one night on a train for the third year in a row! I wonder whether 2015 will also feature a lone overnight train?

My sleeping car attendant welcoming passengers - across the platform a car carrier was being unloaded right into the station!

This year’s night on a train was the EuroNight 466 (aka the Wiener Walzer). It started in Budapest, but I boarded at Wien Westbahnhof (Vienna) and stayed on until the end in Zurich. See my earlier post about this journey, which ultimately continued all the way to Barcelona by high-speed train!

This year’s total flying set a new personal record at just shy of 115,000 miles, just edging out 2012 by 3,000 miles. Interestingly, though, those miles were on many more flights – a total of 61 flights, or one every 6 days if evenly spaced throughout the year!  FlightMemory also informs me that I just missed traveling halfway to the moon (but still only 1.2% of the way to the sun…which is hard for me to comprehend). My scheduled time on flights adds up to be exactly equal to 11 days…before considering time waiting at airports, or traveling to or from them!

Despite the small mileage difference, this year’s 61 flights were in way more segments than the 37 in 2012, when I flew to/from Australia and across the Pacific. That means more shorter flights, and in fact I had more journeys split into multiple flights than in the past…such as traveling between London and Oslo via Stavanger both ways (turning two short flights into four really-short ones!).

Caption here

Here is my 2014 map from FlightMemory…missing is South America, but you can see the segmented journeys via Helsinki (HEL) on Finnair and Doha (DOH) on Qatar.

So what were my 2014 flying highlights? The best experience of the year had to be flying on Qatar’s new all-business class A319. I was lucky enough to fly on this only a month after it launched on the London-Doha segments of my trip to/from Kuala Lumpur. A319s are normally short-haul aircraft with 3×3 seating for 100-125 people (like a small 737), but Qatar has taken two of its planes and reconfigured them especially for the premium London-Doha market as an all business-class service with just 40 lie-flat seats. This is the first all business-class service at Heathrow, but British Airways offers something similar using even smaller A318 planes between London City Airport and New York JFK (but they have to stop at Shannon in Ireland westbound to refuel). SAS has recently started an all-business class 737 between Stavanger and Houston (for the oil industry).

This Qatar plane has only ten rows of 2×2 seating. These are very comfortable and are the same seats found in American Airlines’ new A321-T planes being used for New York-LA and New York-San Francisco flights, one of which Astrid and I flew as a red-eye in May from SFO to JFK. Image (c) The Telegraph

The experience was really what I can only imagine a private jet is like – aided by Qatar’s excellent service and there being only 17 people on board on my way back to London. It was pretty funny boarding the plane from a huge gate area at the brand new Hamad International Airport!

Hamad International Airport

The new Hamad International Airport in Doha opened in May, and I got to travel through it in June. And yes, in case you weren’t sure – that is a very large yellow bear in the middle of the terminal.

There wasn’t too much else new or exciting in the year’s flying – nearly half of my flights were either British Airways (18) or American Airlines (12) – but I did travel on four new airlines in 2014. The best was Asiana, the five-star South Korean carrier, where a short hop from Beijing to Seoul on a long-haul A330 aircraft was excellent…lots of leg- and elbow-room, a full meal, and seatback TV with free entertainment in economy! I also traveled for the first time on Dragonair (great service despite a ground delay due to Chinese air traffic control longer than the scheduled flight time from Nanjing to Hong Kong), SAS (five flights to/from Norway…but they seem to be getting tired), and WestJet (Canada’s version of Southwest Airlines).

Score! A few extra (Canadian) dollars to get that awesome exit row seat on some 737s. WestJet is growing by leaps and bounds in Canada, trying to be a northern cousin to Southwest Airlines (they told us they would "get this boeing going" a bit too cheerily). They're also starting service with 737s from Atlantic Canada to Ireland and Scotland...as range improves that is probably, unfortunately, the future.

Score! A few extra (Canadian) dollars to get that awesome exit row seat on some 737s. WestJet is growing by leaps and bounds in Canada, trying to be a northern cousin to Southwest Airlines (they told us they would “get this boeing going” a bit too cheerily). They’re also starting service with 737s from Atlantic Canada to Ireland and Scotland…as range improves that is probably, unfortunately, the future.

I also had some old favorites, including two more trips on the American Airlines excellent new 777-300ER and getting to try their great new A321T transcontinental service from SFO to JFK with Astrid. Finally, it was a busy year for going to and from HEL – I had two more long-haul trips on Finnair via Helsinki, plus – after 18 take-offs and landings at Helsinki where I never left the terminal, I finally entering Finland in August with Astrid!

I have to admit, I have a sweet spot for Finnair...I have flown with them 18 times in the last five years - more than any other airline except British Airways and American Airlines.

I have to admit, I have a sweet spot for Finnair…I have flown with them 18 times in the last five years – more than any other airline except British Airways and American Airlines. This is a Finnair A330 parked on the ground at Helsinki-Vantaa Airport.

Finnair and Helsinki Airport are known as the "Shortcut to Asia" - because of the easy transfer and for being on the great circle route from most of Europe to Asia. Here, however, I experienced a less-than-easy shortcut...boarding a long-haul flight from a bus and stairs in cold and stormy weather!

Finnair and the Helsinki Airport are known as the “Shortcut to Asia” – because of the easy transfer and for being on the great circle route from most of Europe to Asia. Here, however, I experienced a less-than-easy shortcut…boarding a long-haul flight from a bus and stairs in cold and stormy weather! Probably my biggest air travel pet peeve is the use of bus gates – I know it is a “first world problem” but…what can I say… it drives me bonkers!

Caption here about reindeer

Who can argue with the big guy’s airline? He might not be so happy to find out that I like to feast on reindeer on-board though…this year I had a 50% success rate in pre-ordering the special reindeer meal on HEL departures!

Lastly in terms of flight highlights – or perhaps lowlights – it is worth noting that our very first flight of the year – home from celebrating New Year’s 2014 in Dubrovnik – was also the longest flight delay I think I’ve ever had. We left more than six hours late, and had to make an unscheduled stop in Venice to exchange cabin crew (otherwise the original crew wouldn’t have been able to continue all the way to London), which meant that we didn’t land at London Gatwick until well after Midnight.

I won’t tell the whole saga, but after a few months of increasingly threatening e-mails and then a formal letter from us to British Airways they finally very calmly agreed to compensate us for the delay, in accordance with well-established EU law. I had to cite a number of legal cases as precedent and use some very precise language (many thanks to some references from colleagues and the frequent flyer community on the Internet).

The sticking point was whether the delay was due to “extraordinary circumstances” or not…BA said that because they followed the manufacturer’s maintenance procedures the fact that something failed on the previous flight from London to Dubrovnik was extraordinary…which is complete crap. I can see why they try this tack, though, because it takes time and energy to keep pursuing it and they can get very cheap labor in their customer relations/call centers to send these generic responses and potentially save themselves a lot of cash! Luckily it all turned out well, as we were were refunded the cost of our travel (and a bit extra, in fact!). It’s the first holiday we’ve ever gone on where we actually made money.

Caption

Victory was mine! It just proves that persistence pays off…if you have the time and energy to fight. We were lucky that this compensation paid for the entire Dubrovnik trip.

Now, enough of the boring statistics – let me move on to a pictorial review of the year in travel, which will be coming your way tomorrow!